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I January 3, 2013 Page 3 Herman B. Johnson BISMARCK - Herman B. John- n, 91. of Mandan, formerly of each, passed away Dec. 27, 2012, St. Alexius Medical Center in ismarck. &apos;,* Funeral services were held Mort- @y, Dec. 31, at 1 p.m. at Parkway uneral Service, 2330 Tyler Park- 'ay, Bismarck, with the Rev. Dar- rl Ateson officiating. Visitation 'as held one hour prior to the serv- i:e at the funeral home. Herman Benjamin Johnson was rn Aug. 27, 1921, at Wyndmere, .D., to Berthina (Thompson) and hn O. Johnson, the youngest of ve children. Times were hard and worked several jobs to help sup- ,l'rt the family while in high ,hool. Herman graduated from Wynd- mere High School in 1939, and then the University of Minnesota School of Mortuary Science. He served in the United States Army during the Second brld War, serving with distinction in the Medical Corps. Herman moved to Beach in 1950, and married Marguerite (Peggy) Awsumb in October of that year, They owned and operated the Johnson Funeral Chapel in Beach and the Crescent Funeral Home in Wibaux, Mont., until they retired in 1986. "['hey also provided the area ambuhmce service and sold monu- ments. In retirement, Herman and Peggy enjoyed travel in their motor home, as snowbirds in the winter and to Deadwood in the summer. They moved to Mandan in 1996, where they have lived to the pres- ent. Herman took pride in the pro- fessional services he provided to the community. He loved visiting with people, whether at the kitchen table where there was always a fresh pot of coffee, or on the bench in front of the Bulloc]< Hotel on a summer afternoon. They enjoyed a good meal at Jack's Club or the Elks. He enjoyed discussing cars, watching Westerns or listening to Beef Talk By Kris Ringwall Beef Specialist NDSU Extension Service the oldies cranked way up on the Bose. And, he loved his dogs. big or small, his great canine compan- ions that helped keep him active and sharp as a tack until his recent brief illness. Herman was a member of the Elks, American Legion, Amvets, North Dakota Funeral Directors As- sociation, National Funeral Direc- tors Association, and the Masons. Herman is survived by his wife of 62 years, Peggy of Bismarck; his son, Douglas (Jann) of Houston. Texas; his daughter, Joanie Johnson (William Zuger) of Mandan; his nephews, Art Solberg of Wyndmere and John Solberg of Bradenton. Fla." his niece, Carol Jean Johnson Chitders of Moravian Falls. N.C., two grandchildren. Jeff (Angie) Johnson of Kodiak, Alaska, and Jill Watson of Sherman, Texas; and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, John and Berthina: his brothers, Thomas, Arthur, and Gilbert; and his sister, Anna Sol- berg. Memorials are preferred to the Central Dakota Humane Society. Goodnight, good guy. Go to www.parkwayfuneral.com to share memories of Herman and to sign the online guestbook. Fish house regulations Winter anglers are tizminded'that any fish house left unoccupied on North Dakota waters must be made out of materials that will allow it to float. A popular question this time of the year is if campers qualify as legal fish houses. The answer is the same for any structure taken on the ice - if it's left unattended, it must be able to float: if it's not able to float, it must be removed when the angler leaves the ice. Other fish house regulations in- elude: Fish houses do not require a li- cense. Occupied structures do not re- quire identifization. However any unoccupied fish house must hme the owner's name, and either address or telephone number, displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high. Fish houses may not be placed closer than 50 feet in any direction to another house without consent of the occupant of the other fish house. Fish houses shall be removed from all waters by midnight, March 15, of each year. They can be used after" March 15 if they are removed daily. Anglers should refer to the 2012- 14 North Dakota Fishing Guide for winter fishing regulations. Agri Insurance Inc. Term Life Insurance Universal Life Insurance Fixed Annuities Index Annuities IRAs Long-Term Care Ins. Bruce Ross 110 Central Ave. South, Beach, ND (701) 872-4461 (office) (Across from Bank of the West) (701) 872-3075 (home) al BEACH LEGION CLUB 281 E MaIN - Beacu ND 701-872-4362 Pull Bingo Black Tabs Todd Hase, $50 Jack 12-21-12 Live Friday & Saturday I Hours: Mon-Fri. 3pm-lam Sat. lpm-lam Happy Hour: Mon.-Thurs. 5:30-6:30pm Have something that may be newswor- thy that you'd like to share or submit to the Golden Valley News or the Billings County Pioneer? We won't know about it unless you tell us, and we welcome submitted new,, items! It's easy. Just give us a call, e-mail your item and a phone number, or mail a photo and the text that goes along with it. Golden Valley News/Billings County Pi- oneer: P.O. Box 156, Beach, ND 58621 (701) 872-3755; gvnews@midstate.net All Iwant for this year is 2 new bulls The biggest mistake purebred or commercial producers make when buying bulls is not having the bull registrations transferred to their name. That is a serious mistake. It goes without Saying in the beef business, but what better feeling than bringing home a couple of new bulls? All the effort in selecting new bulls comes to an end when the bulls arrive in the yard. However, don't stop there. Granted, they are the right bulls once purchased, no questions asked. As a producer, you purchased the bull, as well as the data that represents the bull. In simplest terms, you purchased the right to produce calves of a de- sired genotype. The calves will be reflective of the genes that the bull has. His DNA is those threads of life that ultimately make up who we are. The bull's genes were measured and presented as data at the time of sale. By utilizing that data, bulls may be sorted and selected with consid- erable accuracy. However, the data does not stop with the purchase of the bull. Breed associations con- stantly are updating their databases and fine-tuning the expected prog- eny differences (EPDs) for all bulls. As ),our bull ages, his database is growing at breed headquarters. In time, a producer can print the revised EPDs to better evahmte selection ob- jectives and progress by reviewing past and new bull purchases. Recently, as the animal breeding class finished at scho,ol, one of the students was challenged to more thoroughly evaluate bull purchases. Unfortunately, previous bull num- bers had not been maintained, so the student did not feel it was possible to go back in time. Fortunately, the family had transferred the ownership of several previously purchased bulls. The student was encouraged to contact the breed association to help find the EPD values on older bulls. Because the bulls had been trans- ferred to a new owner, the associa- tion was able to supply intbrmation on current and past bulls. Some of the information went back three decades. A review" of the historic and cur- rentdata roade for an, excellent class project and great take-home mes- sage. Yes, bulls have changed and the genetic trends are very telling. Therefore, for the new year, evaluate the old bulls and treat yourself to a new bull or two. Each year's crop of calves brings with it a whole new set of bull prospects. The thoughts of newness, such as new inspirations, desire and a general feeling of letting go of the okl and in with the new, are good. Keep the registration number, but why not let go of those old bulls to open doors to new genetics? Each fall, the Dickinson Research Extension Center empties the bull pen of all those bulls that got benched. This opens up some slots for new bulls. There always is the option to carry an older bull for an- other year. However, breeding cows on pasture is demanding, so the bull's slight limp soon becomes a major fault in next year's breeding pastures and certainly increases the potential for new injuries and some cows not getting bred. Granted. the expectation of hav- ing the bull for three years or longer is not out of line. However, some bulls just don't make it for several reasons, including structural diffi- culties or their attitude changes. They may start viewing their owners as herd mates and can become dan- gerous. A producer should thoroughly ewduate structure, body condition and conduct and do an early breed- ing soundness exam on all of the ma- ture bulls. Minor problems will become major problems once ex- posed to cycling cows. Once the bull pen has been eval- uated, make sure the keepers get extra hay that will put 150 to 300 pounds (1/2 to l pound of gain daily) on the bulls throughout the non- breeding season. This will allow the bulls to meet their normal growth curve. This sometimes does create a challenge because the bulls slowly become too heavy to be effective breeding bulls. However, healthy, active bulls are the desired bulls, not the thin, under- fed bulls waiting in line for survival rations. No one denies the cost of keeping a bull, so why not make sure you are putting the costs into good bulls and not marginal bulls'? What store catalogs have a good section on bulls'? Well, none of them. at least in the world of Urban shop ping. However, bull catalogs almost are mandatory reading for the aver- age bull buyer, and it won't be long before there will be a bull sale every day of the week. Look for a couple of new bulls, but before you sell the old, make sure you get the registration number mmsferred and tucked away for later data evaluations. May you find all your ear tags, (Ringwall is a North Dakota State UniversiO; Extension Service live- stock specialist and the Dickinson Research Extension Center director.) DEADLINES The deadline for submitted copy and stories and all ad orders is noon on Fridays. Call 872-3755 or e-mail g 00.net. Bradens retire Floyd and Ida Braden of Beach receive a retirement plaque from Golden Valley/Billings Multi-county Social Services Board President Wanda Olson. The Bradens performed main- tenance work for social services for 15 years before retiring in 2012. (Courtesy Photo) Goehring urges taki BISMARCK - Agriculture Com- missioner Doug Goehring urges North Dakota farmers and ranchers to participate in the 2012 Census of Agriculture. "This is a major opportunity Ibr farmers and ranchers to influence the decisions that will shape the future of their operations, their communities and the entire agricultural industry," Goehring said. "'Information gath- ered in the census impacts farm pro- grams and rural services that support our communities." The National Agricultural Statis- tics Service (NASS) is mailing out census forms in late December to collect data for the 2012 calendar year. Completed forms are due by Feb. 4, 2013. Producers can fill out the census online via a secure web- site, www.agcensus.usda.gov, or re- turn their form by mail. "The census remains the only source of uniform, comprehensive agricultural data for every county in the nation," said Renee Picanso. di- rector of NASS's Census and Survey Division. Conducted every five years, the Census of Agriculture is a complete count of all U.S. farms, ranches and Put Your Mone . I oca/ depe de t /zr: strengthen o.r I I I ng part in ag census those who operate them. It examines hmd use and ownership, operator characteristics, production practices. income and expenditures and other topics. "This information is used by fed- eral, state and local governments, agribusinesses, trade associations and others who serve farmers and rural communities," Goehring said. "'It is especially important in North Dakota, where agriculture is the largest segment of our economy." Federal law requires all agricul- tural producers to participate in the Census of Agriculture and requires NASS to keep all individual intbr- mation confidential. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Van or Bus Service Billings County Golden Valley County Distance of 160 Miles CALL 701-872-3836 NOTICE: During the week that includes the New Year's Day holiday, the Golden Valley County and Billings County newspapers aren't scheduled to arrive in readers' mail until Friday. BEACH St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Rev. Dan Berg Mass: Saturday 4 p.m. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Golden Valley Manor Chapel Pastor Ron Hudson of Calvary Chapel Sundays: 6:30, Communion, first Sunday in each month St. Paul's Lutheran Church, LCMS Rev. Scott Hojnacki Sunday Worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday School: I l: l5 a.m. First Lutheran Church - ELCA Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday School: 8:10 a.m. Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.ln. Beach Evangelical Church Pastor Ben Baker Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. BELFIELD St. Peter's Lutheran- LCMS Rev. Scott Hojnacki Worship Service: Sunday - 8 a.m. St. Bernard's Catholic Church-: Rev. Bill Reulle Saturday: Confessions 6-6:45 p.m: Mass: 7 p.m. Sunday: Confessions 7:30',[5 Mass: 8:30 p.m. ,., St..John Ukrainian Catholic Church  Rev. Taras Miles Divine Liturgy: 8 a.m. t. third and fifth Suadays,: l0 a.m. on second andfourth.$un- 0ays Belfield ran - ELCA Rev. er Dieterle Sunday SchooI(all ages): 11 a.m. Sunday Wship: I0 a.m.: Daglum Lnermn Cliurch - EECA Rev. Roar Dierter!e (Located 25 il southeast of Belfield) Sunday Worship:4;l:45 a.mil on first and third Sunday of each month Belfield Baptist Chureh ii " i Rev. Robert Hlibichuk Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday Bible Study: 10 a.m. FAIRFIELD - St. Demetrius Ukrainian Catholic Church Rev. Taras Miles Sunday Divine Liturgy: 8 a.m on :'cond and fourth Sundays, loam. on first, third and fifth Sundays GOL VA St. Mary' CatholicChurch Rev. Dan Berg Mass: 8 a.m,,unday MEDORA Medora Lutheran - ELCA Rex,." Roger Dierterle Sundy Worship: 8:30 a.m. Sunday! Sehool: 3.30 p.m., Wed. Union Congregational Church JUn Jttly and August only Sunday Worship: t0:30 a.m "  St. Mary sCatholie Church No Mass tom November through April SENTINEL BUTTE These schedules are brought to you by." 221N. MeadeAve. Glendive, MT59330 406-377-2622 or 1-800-368-2690 Silvernale-Silha Funeral Home www.silvernale-silhaneralhome.com 201SouthWibaux St. 53 lstAvenue S.E. Wibaux, MT 59353 Beach, ND 58621 406-796-2421 701-872-3232 or 1-800-892-6424 Trinity Lutheran Church Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday Worship: 8 a.m. SOUTH HEART St. Mary's Catholic Church Rev. Bill Reulle Confessions before Mass Saturday Mass: 4 p.m. TR 0 T TERS Trotters Church 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month WIBA UX United Methodist Church Pastor Ruth McKenzie Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Calvary Temple, Assembly of God Pastor Reese Stephans Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church - ELCA Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday Worship: 11:15 a.m. Christian Fundamental Church Pastor Jeremy Stradley Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship: I I a.m. JAMES J. WOSEPKA, P.C. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT Licensed In North Dakota and Montana 41 Central Ave. South P.O. Box 970 Beach, North Dakota 58621 701-872-4321 [ , t I January 3, 2013 Page 3 Herman B. Johnson BISMARCK - Herman B. John- n, 91. of Mandan, formerly of each, passed away Dec. 27, 2012, St. Alexius Medical Center in ismarck. ',* Funeral services were held Mort- @y, Dec. 31, at 1 p.m. at Parkway uneral Service, 2330 Tyler Park- 'ay, Bismarck, with the Rev. Dar- rl Ateson officiating. Visitation 'as held one hour prior to the serv- i:e at the funeral home. Herman Benjamin Johnson was rn Aug. 27, 1921, at Wyndmere, .D., to Berthina (Thompson) and hn O. Johnson, the youngest of ve children. Times were hard and worked several jobs to help sup- ,l'rt the family while in high ,hool. Herman graduated from Wynd- mere High School in 1939, and then the University of Minnesota School of Mortuary Science. He served in the United States Army during the Second brld War, serving with distinction in the Medical Corps. Herman moved to Beach in 1950, and married Marguerite (Peggy) Awsumb in October of that year, They owned and operated the Johnson Funeral Chapel in Beach and the Crescent Funeral Home in Wibaux, Mont., until they retired in 1986. "['hey also provided the area ambuhmce service and sold monu- ments. In retirement, Herman and Peggy enjoyed travel in their motor home, as snowbirds in the winter and to Deadwood in the summer. They moved to Mandan in 1996, where they have lived to the pres- ent. Herman took pride in the pro- fessional services he provided to the community. He loved visiting with people, whether at the kitchen table where there was always a fresh pot of coffee, or on the bench in front of the Bulloc]< Hotel on a summer afternoon. They enjoyed a good meal at Jack's Club or the Elks. He enjoyed discussing cars, watching Westerns or listening to Beef Talk By Kris Ringwall Beef Specialist NDSU Extension Service the oldies cranked way up on the Bose. And, he loved his dogs. big or small, his great canine compan- ions that helped keep him active and sharp as a tack until his recent brief illness. Herman was a member of the Elks, American Legion, Amvets, North Dakota Funeral Directors As- sociation, National Funeral Direc- tors Association, and the Masons. Herman is survived by his wife of 62 years, Peggy of Bismarck; his son, Douglas (Jann) of Houston. Texas; his daughter, Joanie Johnson (William Zuger) of Mandan; his nephews, Art Solberg of Wyndmere and John Solberg of Bradenton. Fla." his niece, Carol Jean Johnson Chitders of Moravian Falls. N.C., two grandchildren. Jeff (Angie) Johnson of Kodiak, Alaska, and Jill Watson of Sherman, Texas; and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, John and Berthina: his brothers, Thomas, Arthur, and Gilbert; and his sister, Anna Sol- berg. Memorials are preferred to the Central Dakota Humane Society. Goodnight, good guy. Go to www.parkwayfuneral.com to share memories of Herman and to sign the online guestbook. Fish house regulations Winter anglers are tizminded'that any fish house left unoccupied on North Dakota waters must be made out of materials that will allow it to float. A popular question this time of the year is if campers qualify as legal fish houses. The answer is the same for any structure taken on the ice - if it's left unattended, it must be able to float: if it's not able to float, it must be removed when the angler leaves the ice. Other fish house regulations in- elude: Fish houses do not require a li- cense. Occupied structures do not re- quire identifization. However any unoccupied fish house must hme the owner's name, and either address or telephone number, displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high. Fish houses may not be placed closer than 50 feet in any direction to another house without consent of the occupant of the other fish house. Fish houses shall be removed from all waters by midnight, March 15, of each year. They can be used after" March 15 if they are removed daily. Anglers should refer to the 2012- 14 North Dakota Fishing Guide for winter fishing regulations. Agri Insurance Inc. Term Life Insurance Universal Life Insurance Fixed Annuities Index Annuities IRAs Long-Term Care Ins. Bruce Ross 110 Central Ave. South, Beach, ND (701) 872-4461 (office) (Across from Bank of the West) (701) 872-3075 (home) al BEACH LEGION CLUB 281 E MaIN - Beacu ND 701-872-4362 Pull Bingo Black Tabs Todd Hase, $50 Jack 12-21-12 Live Friday & Saturday I Hours: Mon-Fri. 3pm-lam Sat. lpm-lam Happy Hour: Mon.-Thurs. 5:30-6:30pm Have something that may be newswor- thy that you'd like to share or submit to the Golden Valley News or the Billings County Pioneer? We won't know about it unless you tell us, and we welcome submitted new,, items! It's easy. Just give us a call, e-mail your item and a phone number, or mail a photo and the text that goes along with it. Golden Valley News/Billings County Pi- oneer: P.O. Box 156, Beach, ND 58621 (701) 872-3755; gvnews@midstate.net All Iwant for this year is 2 new bulls The biggest mistake purebred or commercial producers make when buying bulls is not having the bull registrations transferred to their name. That is a serious mistake. It goes without Saying in the beef business, but what better feeling than bringing home a couple of new bulls? All the effort in selecting new bulls comes to an end when the bulls arrive in the yard. However, don't stop there. Granted, they are the right bulls once purchased, no questions asked. As a producer, you purchased the bull, as well as the data that represents the bull. In simplest terms, you purchased the right to produce calves of a de- sired genotype. The calves will be reflective of the genes that the bull has. His DNA is those threads of life that ultimately make up who we are. The bull's genes were measured and presented as data at the time of sale. By utilizing that data, bulls may be sorted and selected with consid- erable accuracy. However, the data does not stop with the purchase of the bull. Breed associations con- stantly are updating their databases and fine-tuning the expected prog- eny differences (EPDs) for all bulls. As ),our bull ages, his database is growing at breed headquarters. In time, a producer can print the revised EPDs to better evahmte selection ob- jectives and progress by reviewing past and new bull purchases. Recently, as the animal breeding class finished at scho,ol, one of the students was challenged to more thoroughly evaluate bull purchases. Unfortunately, previous bull num- bers had not been maintained, so the student did not feel it was possible to go back in time. Fortunately, the family had transferred the ownership of several previously purchased bulls. The student was encouraged to contact the breed association to help find the EPD values on older bulls. Because the bulls had been trans- ferred to a new owner, the associa- tion was able to supply intbrmation on current and past bulls. Some of the information went back three decades. A review" of the historic and cur- rentdata roade for an, excellent class project and great take-home mes- sage. Yes, bulls have changed and the genetic trends are very telling. Therefore, for the new year, evaluate the old bulls and treat yourself to a new bull or two. Each year's crop of calves brings with it a whole new set of bull prospects. The thoughts of newness, such as new inspirations, desire and a general feeling of letting go of the okl and in with the new, are good. Keep the registration number, but why not let go of those old bulls to open doors to new genetics? Each fall, the Dickinson Research Extension Center empties the bull pen of all those bulls that got benched. This opens up some slots for new bulls. There always is the option to carry an older bull for an- other year. However, breeding cows on pasture is demanding, so the bull's slight limp soon becomes a major fault in next year's breeding pastures and certainly increases the potential for new injuries and some cows not getting bred. Granted. the expectation of hav- ing the bull for three years or longer is not out of line. However, some bulls just don't make it for several reasons, including structural diffi- culties or their attitude changes. They may start viewing their owners as herd mates and can become dan- gerous. A producer should thoroughly ewduate structure, body condition and conduct and do an early breed- ing soundness exam on all of the ma- ture bulls. Minor problems will become major problems once ex- posed to cycling cows. Once the bull pen has been eval- uated, make sure the keepers get extra hay that will put 150 to 300 pounds (1/2 to l pound of gain daily) on the bulls throughout the non- breeding season. This will allow the bulls to meet their normal growth curve. This sometimes does create a challenge because the bulls slowly become too heavy to be effective breeding bulls. However, healthy, active bulls are the desired bulls, not the thin, under- fed bulls waiting in line for survival rations. No one denies the cost of keeping a bull, so why not make sure you are putting the costs into good bulls and not marginal bulls'? What store catalogs have a good section on bulls'? Well, none of them. at least in the world of Urban shop ping. However, bull catalogs almost are mandatory reading for the aver- age bull buyer, and it won't be long before there will be a bull sale every day of the week. Look for a couple of new bulls, but before you sell the old, make sure you get the registration number mmsferred and tucked away for later data evaluations. May you find all your ear tags, (Ringwall is a North Dakota State UniversiO; Extension Service live- stock specialist and the Dickinson Research Extension Center director.) DEADLINES The deadline for submitted copy and stories and all ad orders is noon on Fridays. Call 872-3755 or e-mail g 00.net. Bradens retire Floyd and Ida Braden of Beach receive a retirement plaque from Golden Valley/Billings Multi-county Social Services Board President Wanda Olson. The Bradens performed main- tenance work for social services for 15 years before retiring in 2012. (Courtesy Photo) Goehring urges taki BISMARCK - Agriculture Com- missioner Doug Goehring urges North Dakota farmers and ranchers to participate in the 2012 Census of Agriculture. "This is a major opportunity Ibr farmers and ranchers to influence the decisions that will shape the future of their operations, their communities and the entire agricultural industry," Goehring said. "'Information gath- ered in the census impacts farm pro- grams and rural services that support our communities." The National Agricultural Statis- tics Service (NASS) is mailing out census forms in late December to collect data for the 2012 calendar year. Completed forms are due by Feb. 4, 2013. Producers can fill out the census online via a secure web- site, www.agcensus.usda.gov, or re- turn their form by mail. "The census remains the only source of uniform, comprehensive agricultural data for every county in the nation," said Renee Picanso. di- rector of NASS's Census and Survey Division. Conducted every five years, the Census of Agriculture is a complete count of all U.S. farms, ranches and Put Your Mone . I oca/ depe de t /zr: strengthen o.r I I I ng part in ag census those who operate them. It examines hmd use and ownership, operator characteristics, production practices. income and expenditures and other topics. "This information is used by fed- eral, state and local governments, agribusinesses, trade associations and others who serve farmers and rural communities," Goehring said. "'It is especially important in North Dakota, where agriculture is the largest segment of our economy." Federal law requires all agricul- tural producers to participate in the Census of Agriculture and requires NASS to keep all individual intbr- mation confidential. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Van or Bus Service Billings County Golden Valley County Distance of 160 Miles CALL 701-872-3836 NOTICE: During the week that includes the New Year's Day holiday, the Golden Valley County and Billings County newspapers aren't scheduled to arrive in readers' mail until Friday. BEACH St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Rev. Dan Berg Mass: Saturday 4 p.m. Sunday: 10:30 a.m. Golden Valley Manor Chapel Pastor Ron Hudson of Calvary Chapel Sundays: 6:30, Communion, first Sunday in each month St. Paul's Lutheran Church, LCMS Rev. Scott Hojnacki Sunday Worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday School: I l: l5 a.m. First Lutheran Church - ELCA Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday School: 8:10 a.m. Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.ln. Beach Evangelical Church Pastor Ben Baker Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. BELFIELD St. Peter's Lutheran- LCMS Rev. Scott Hojnacki Worship Service: Sunday - 8 a.m. St. Bernard's Catholic Church-: Rev. Bill Reulle Saturday: Confessions 6-6:45 p.m: Mass: 7 p.m. Sunday: Confessions 7:30',[5 Mass: 8:30 p.m. ,., St..John Ukrainian Catholic Church  Rev. Taras Miles Divine Liturgy: 8 a.m. t. third and fifth Suadays,: l0 a.m. on second andfourth.$un- 0ays Belfield ran - ELCA Rev. er Dieterle Sunday SchooI(all ages): 11 a.m. Sunday Wship: I0 a.m.: Daglum Lnermn Cliurch - EECA Rev. Roar Dierter!e (Located 25 il southeast of Belfield) Sunday Worship:4;l:45 a.mil on first and third Sunday of each month Belfield Baptist Chureh ii " i Rev. Robert Hlibichuk Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday Bible Study: 10 a.m. FAIRFIELD - St. Demetrius Ukrainian Catholic Church Rev. Taras Miles Sunday Divine Liturgy: 8 a.m on :'cond and fourth Sundays, loam. on first, third and fifth Sundays GOL VA St. Mary' CatholicChurch Rev. Dan Berg Mass: 8 a.m,,unday MEDORA Medora Lutheran - ELCA Rex,." Roger Dierterle Sundy Worship: 8:30 a.m. Sunday! Sehool: 3.30 p.m., Wed. Union Congregational Church JUn Jttly and August only Sunday Worship: t0:30 a.m "  St. Mary sCatholie Church No Mass tom November through April SENTINEL BUTTE These schedules are brought to you by." 221N. MeadeAve. Glendive, MT59330 406-377-2622 or 1-800-368-2690 Silvernale-Silha Funeral Home www.silvernale-silhaneralhome.com 201SouthWibaux St. 53 lstAvenue S.E. Wibaux, MT 59353 Beach, ND 58621 406-796-2421 701-872-3232 or 1-800-892-6424 Trinity Lutheran Church Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday Worship: 8 a.m. SOUTH HEART St. Mary's Catholic Church Rev. Bill Reulle Confessions before Mass Saturday Mass: 4 p.m. TR 0 T TERS Trotters Church 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month WIBA UX United Methodist Church Pastor Ruth McKenzie Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Calvary Temple, Assembly of God Pastor Reese Stephans Sunday Worship: 10:45 a.m. Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church - ELCA Pastor J.T. Burk Sunday Worship: 11:15 a.m. Christian Fundamental Church Pastor Jeremy Stradley Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Sunday Worship: I I a.m. JAMES J. WOSEPKA, P.C. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT Licensed In North Dakota and Montana 41 Central Ave. South P.O. Box 970 Beach, North Dakota 58621 701-872-4321 [ , t