Newspaper Archive of
The Billings County Pioneer
Beach, North Dakota
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February 16, 1961     The Billings County Pioneer
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February 16, 1961
 

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' INVffE$ YOU TO ENJOY THE i 'H-OPITALITY OF THE .... HOTEL. HASTINGS = Special family and week-end t rates, Drive.in parking conveni- ence at no cost to guests. Write now for Ideally located just a short walk to the loop. :All rooms with bath and radio, many with "rv. = Home of the Callboard Bar and Grill. (It's the talk of the town.) The Hastings is justly proud of its reputation as the 'frienmy hotel." You'll appreciate the llW ,o.r,,,,.o..o,.----m-motel comfort and convenience of modern appointments designed descriptive  to make your visit a memorable inforw..ation ,,,,,,to,,. -i00astings ooe. SENSIBLE RATES FROM $5.00 32 NORTH 12TH STREET * MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.. THE BILLINGS COUNTY PIONEER, MEDORA, N. DAK. HOSPITAL NOTES SURGERY Art Underwood, Sentinel ,Butte Mrs. Win. Smitfl% Powers Lake. ]W ADMI:SSIONS Joe A. Streitz, Win. Wirtzfeld, Mrs. Earl Roberts, Wilbur Chaf fee, jr., Mike Makelky, Jeff Bret- tin, Mrs. Ina Stone, Ronald ,Dietz, Mrs. Carl Carlson, Mrs. Lloyd Metcalf, Ernest Feldman, Lars Vanvig, Mrs. Martha Hughes. DEATHS Carl Carlson, Beach. New Employee- Miss Marion B-irdsall is a new i employee .of the Golden Valley News, starting her office training i this Monday, Feb. 13. She was a student at Asbury College in  Wilmore, Ky., before returning home recently. She is the daugh- ter of Rev. and Mrs. C. Lee Bird- sall of Beach. Mrs. Frank Kipp- ley is instructing Miss Birdsall, and the latter will be taking the place of Janet Uelmen, who was the bookkeeper, and assisted with news reporting for the pas.t t several months. Miss Uelmen is now at home, where she is kept busy daily with household duties a.d caring for her mother who i. convalescing after a prolonge4 illness. Drive so you'll arrive ALIVE! PETE'S AU'TO g 'MPL. i HIGHWA 22 SO DICKINSON, N DAK PHONE 513 SP00[NG TRACTOR SALE - - PLUS FREE FUEL with NEW and USED. We will give from 100 to 500 gallons of any fuel FREE with the purchase of any tractor, used or new. This will be based on the difference you spend on any tractor from $500 on up. For example: on a used tractor deal of $500 difference, you will receive 100 gallons and for every $100 over and above this an additional 25 gallons up to 500 gallons. On a new CASE tractor, diesel, gas or propane with a difference of $1000, you will receive 100 gallons and 15 gallons additional for every $100 over $1000 up to 500 gallons. 011 New Ford or Fordson Power Major Del. you can get up to 800 gallons of fuel basing it on 6 months or 400 hours, rwhichever occurs first. The difference in the purchase of a used or New' Tractor need not be in cash in order to qualify for the FUEL BONUS, the balance may be put on a contract for as many as 3 or 4 years. If, however, you should be short of cash for a full down payment at the time you purchase a tractor, Ucan Pay down as much as possible and we will wait for the remainder the down payment up to 30 days without interest, that will assure You of a tractor of your choice. This sale on new or used tractors good until APRIL 1st, 1961. Therefore, hurry, take fuel advantage of this wonderful saving to you. come in and pick your choice from the wide selection of good used TRACTORs we now have on hand and save many $ $ $ $ $ $. 1959 Cockshutt 570 Dsl. Power-steering, hy. and 4-row cult ..... $4950 1953 Cockshqtt 40 Dsl. very good condition ................................... $1650 :'ternational Super WD9 w/live hdy. & PTO. Ex. cond ........ $2750 1949 International WD9 w/live hdy. New rubber all around, ex. __ $1650 1949 International WD9 w/live hdy. New rubber on rear. Ex. cond. $1600 1950 International WD9, very good ................................................... $1450 1951 International M with loader, very good cond. $1550 1948 International M, good condition ................................................ $1095 1949 International TD6 Crawler ......................................................... $1395 1948 International TD9 Crawler with hyd. and new dozer $2750 1950 John Deere R Dsl. A-1 cond ..................................................... $1750 1951 John Deere D overhauled .............. ___ .......................................... $395 1944 John Deere A narrow front, also have2 row cult. to fit ........ $595 1950 LA Case excellent cond. New tires and Powerpaek ................ $1050 1948 LA Case, ex. eond., good rubber, hyd. & PTO ............................ $650 i953 M-Moline U with live hyd. & PTO. Just like new $1295 1951 M-Moline U, very good eond. ,: ........ ,: .................................... $650 1948 M'Moline Z with hyd. (live) and 2 row cult ............................... $550 1951 Massey Harris 44 Dsl. w/2 row hyd. cult ........................... $1400 1952 May Harris 55 Dsl.! eompL overhauled, new rubber & hyd. $1650 1953 NAA Ford, low hours like new ...... $1150 1952 Feed 8N overhauled ; $650 1952 Ford 8N with backhoe and loader .............................. $1850 1947 Ford 8N ...................................................... - 1955 Fordson Major Dsl. i ,.=----:--_4 .......... $1650 1959 Fordson Power Major Dsl, This,tractor like new, new warranty $2595 1947 Oliver 70 i .... - .................. -: ............................................... $250 ANNOUNC00NG theall new FORD 6000 DIESEL Plow F(ting=ls n ".m the all!.::New ltevolutioal=ed, most, to date 'five  I. _ -t us=. tractor. With its powerfUJ 6 eyL diesel;e developing .o;'P[_atd eeono.miead to operate, it's moderii up to date design, in row :m you wu! have a tractor for all purpme farming. The power hyd. system, power adjusted wheels are all standard equipment ,6000 ti Tractor. WATCHI!RTHE :!6000 on March 24th. It will be here then 'for you :ti inspect and admire. m m m m m m IIIliillflillillllllllllllillllllllllllllllllilillllllllllllllllllllil m m m m m m m m ! THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1961 Realistic Training, Tough Standarc[s Vital to Guard's Missile-Age Role As annual observance of Mus- ter Day gets underway, 472,000 National Guardsmen face what Major General Donald W. Mc- Gowan terms, "Perhaps the sternest test that has ever con- fronted our nation's civilian soldiers." General McGowan, Chief of the National Guard Bureau, adds that, "Guardsmen in 2,500 U. S. communities must attain goals never dreamed of in past years in order to be ready, to serve their country. and community." . While "Oper- iation M u s t e r [:-iii ! 96I" carries on Q a tradition that dates back to ili earliest e o 1 o- nial days, in this modern era :it amounts to a communi- ty - by - com- :'' munlty progress en. mcuowanreport on each G u a r d unit's status of readi- ness. At National Guard armor- ies and air bases, troops and equipment may be inspected by the public. In colonial days, the militia, forerunner of the modern Min- ute Men, was mustered on the village green once a year so that the leaders of a community could see how many able-bodied men kvould be at hand to bear arms in an emergency. "Today," says General Mc- Gowan, the question ef how many men are at" hand is sec- ondary to how well prepared they are to carry out the duties expected of them in the event o; an emergency." A ranking officer of the T. S. Army observed at the time of the Korean emergency that; "If the National Guard is to perform its historical role as an integral part of the first line of defense of the United States it must adjust to the require- ments of modern warfare." This adjustment to the mis- sile age of warfare is well un- derway, in both ground and air elements of the National Guard, according to Gen. McGowan. In fifteen States, Army Na- tional Guard units man NIKE- AJAX air defense sites. Soon a total of 82 batteries will "be on-site in this program. In the Hawaiian Islands where Army and Air National Guard units are responsible for the island training in the employment of the Honest John artillery rocket and equipment soon will be in the hands of their picked bat- teries. In the air, squadrons of Air National Guardsmen play an important role in both air de- fense and tactical support All What? No Seat Belts? Eskimo Scouts of the Alaska A r m y National Guard climbed aboard a railroad train for the first time recently, and very nearly got right off again all because the train had no seat belts. These unique civilian. soldiers h a d previously done all their traveling by dog sled and airplane. In either case they were ac- customed to seat belts for safety. It took consider- able conversation to :colt-: vince them they wouldn't need them on the train. The Scouts, who nor- mally patrol the Alaskan coastal areas a few scdnt miles from Russian Siber- ia, were en route to a training exercise area. of these squadrons are now fully jet-equipped including the su- personic F-104; the 1,400 mph Starfighter.. Air Guard strategic transport squadrons slated for M-Day duty with MATS (Military Ai Transport Service) are rapidlF being equipped with giant Boe- ing: C-97 Stratofreighters to give them a new and exciting global potential. "As we man the exotic weap-  ons systems and the types of units that are needed for mod ern warfare, the challenge faoo. ing the Guardsman becomes more severe," Gem McGowan points out. "Tougher training standards are being met, and intense realism is inected into every training exercise." The bulk of the National Guard today consists of 21 in- infantry divisions, six armored divisions, and hundreds of other units on the Army side; 78 com- bat squadrons plus 14 aeromedio ca! and heavy transport squad- rons on the Air side. The training received by all these National Guard units, for. combat missions and for com- munications, medical evacuation, and mass-feeding roles, perfect- ly prepares them .to support State disaster plans and any civilian emergency arising in the home states. UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MEN air defenses, the Guard main- talus round-the-clock radar sur- MODERN ASPECTS of Natimtal Guard training are reflected in the veillance and is manning HIKE- equipment used by 400,000 Army Guardsmen. The current arsenal -- HERCULES b a t t e r i e s and includes Patton M-48 tanks (see top photo) and powerful artillery i fighter interceptor aircraft, weanous (see bottom uhotos). At left, an armored, self-propelled Priority'combat divisions of artillery p'ieee; at right, the "Honest John", an artillery rocket that the Army llational Guard are can be equipped with an atomic warhead under battlefield condition& HIGH SCHOOL EQUIV. Anyone wishing to take the j/--/ EXAMS FEB. 24-25 exams must be on hand prompt -t Wlq|. W. Eichhors  Examinations for the state 'ly af 1 'p;rn., Fri., Feb. 24. t "'=-r--- I, high school equivalency diploma - ............ I m ueX , will be given at the State Teach- M n " _. . [ tith offices in a agzng t;evazor --, I E L D ors College, Dickinson, N. D., B E L F !Room 308, on Friday afternoon "Chuck" Rathbun left. Sunday[ ...... S KTUBDKYS ..... and Saturda Feb ' muau.qz W"-U"-UAZ Y, . 24 and 25. for Garski, N. D., where he took I " _ I Exams will begin at 1 p.m. over management of the Farmersi ...... '.m'.,7' ..... on Friday and will be interrupt- Elevator. His family will be join- u==e= - i,uuz ed at 5:30 to resume at 8 a.m. ing him in the near future.[ MIDA. = Ion Sat., lasting until all candi- Garski is located north of Devils ..... ',,_.., .... dates have completed the tests. Lake. I/'__. John Deere TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 Free Lunch at 1i.30 a.m. AT THE LEGION HALL Free Show: utl onTheatre ' E " " that'll the hole tamil00 ntertamment w DAKOTA FARM EOUIP.' Cig